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Name of Article:
Assessing Perceptions of Environmental Risk and Environmental Justice and Their Impacts on Neighborhood Attachment in a Predominately Hispanic Community 
Title of Book/Journal:
Dissertation Abstracts International 
Type:
Article 
English Translation:
 
Publication Date:
2001     
Author(s):
Jones, Russell Douglas
 Editor(s):
 
Volume:
64 
Issue: 8
Pages: 3774    
Corporate Author:
 
Publisher:
   
EPA Number:
 
Other Number:
   
Keyword(s):
CHILDREN
COMMUNITY
HEALTH
HISPANICS
LOW INCOME COMMUNITIES
MINORITY COMMUNITIES
U.S.-MEXICO BORDER
TEXAS-EL PASO COUNTY
Comments:
 
 
 
 
    
 
Annotation:
This study examines and relates concepts from environmental risk perception and environmental justice and focuses on the perception of environmental problems, their consequent health risks and their impact on neighborhood attachment in a predominately Hispanic community along the U.S.-Mexico border. The findings indicate that the perception of environmental problems in the immediate area varies by problem and demographic subgroup. The author found that ethnicity and income have the highest number of statistically significant associations across ten environmental problems and that this result lies in the fact that Hispanics in El Paso County, Texas, and those with low annual incomes live in neighborhoods that are faced with more severe environmental problems. The author argues that these findings support the environmental justice claim that low income people and minorities bear the brunt of environmental degradation. The author also argues that these findings provide evidence that public perception of health risks from an environmental problem is influenced by the perceived severity of an environmental problem in the immediate area. The findings of this study also indicate that the young, Hispanics, those who perceive considerable environmental problems in their neighborhood, those who believe that their neighborhood has more environmental problems than others, and those who are angry about those problems are most likely to want to move from their neighborhood. The author concludes that efforts are needed to enact policies and programs designed to reduce the environmental hazards in disadvantaged Hispanic communities along the U.S.-Mexico border and that future environmental education campaigns need to complement community-based projects with the media. The author recommends programs that involve and empower the community, particularly the youth, in improving the neighborhood to provide a sense of control and pride within their community to solve these proble
 
 
       
 
 
 

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Last updated on Monday, December 2nd, 2002
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